A Roundtable Review of Hazel Smith’s Markets and Military Rule

By | January 21, 2016

How unique is North Korea? A quartet of contributions from Rudiger Frank, Georgy Toloraya, Christopher Green, and Robert Winstanley-Chesters address this question, via review of an important new book.

Focusing Illusions: ROK Opinion Polling and the North Korea Lens

By | January 19, 2016

Responding to a recent article linking attitudes toward North Korea with an emerging form of nationalism in South Korea, Christopher Green argues that the real drivers of identity and attitudinal change are to be found elsewhere.

Bringing Generational Analysis Back In? An Interview with Shelley Rigger

By | January 18, 2016

Shelley Rigger, professor of political science at Davidson College, discusses the methodological value of generational analysis for the study of values, political attitudes, and social identities.

Chests Full of Brass: A DPRK Political History in Orders, Medals, Prizes, and Titles

By | January 08, 2016

The DPRK state structure can be hard to discern from the outside, but it is possible to structure analysis so as to dissipate the fog somewhat. Here, Martin Weiser wields the state system of awards and medals to shed light on national history.

Resiliency and Opacity: A Review of North Korea: Markets and Military Rule

By and | January 05, 2016

Coming temporarily out of retirement, Jacques Hersh and Ellen Brun, European leftist intellectuals and Asianists of yore, review Hazel Smith’s mighty tome on markets and military rule.

Investment Risks and Riddles: Zhejiang Businessmen and the DPRK

By | December 15, 2015

Chinese sources are no panacea for the dearth of official data coming from the DPRK. But with a sharp-eyed detachment, they can still help. Translating a 2013 article on DPRK economic relations with the Chinese province of Zhejiang, Matthew Bates shows us how.

Talking About the Unconscious: Interview with Professor Hyun Ok Park

By | December 09, 2015

Sino-NK interviews the author of a protean and provocative new book on transnational Korea.

Subscribe