Author Archive

The Crossings and Encounters of Kim Jong-suk: “And did those feet in ancient times…”

By | April 09, 2015

The second piece in a three-part series, Robert Winstanley-Chesters looks in detail at the de- and reterritorialization of charismatic authority in the story of Kim Jong-suk, the so-called “Mother of Military-first Chosun.”

Yongusil 65: Adam Cathcart on the Footprints of Legitimacy

By | April 07, 2015

Pyongyang’s narrative response to the ascension of Kim Jong-un has drawn deep and heavy upon the past, indicating a certain conservatism and “ideological retrenchment,” argues Adam Cathcart in a SOAS-AKS Working Paper in Korean Studies. Director of Research, Robert Winstanley-Chesters, reviews the paper.

Yongusil 63: Black Panthers and the Sun, Benjamin Young on North Korea and Anti-Colonialist connections

By | March 30, 2015

Director of Research, Robert Winstanley-Chesters, reviews Benjamin Young’s newly published piece in Japan Focus, “Juche in the United States: The Black Panther Party’s Relations with North Korea.”

Footsteps and Deterritorializations: “And did those feet in ancient times…”

By | March 22, 2015

Rodong Sinmun reports on a wintery children’s pilgrimage to North Korea’s northern border, the place where, four score and ten years ago, Kim Il-sung crossed the Yalu. Political geographer Robert Winstanley-Chesters investigates the implications of their reenactment.

Yongusil 58: Benjamin Habib: Building a Literature of North Korean engagement with the UNFCCC

By | February 27, 2015

Following its minimal attendance at recent COP meetings of the UNFCCC, North Korea’s concerns and aspirations surrounding climate change are unclear. Benjamin Habib’s new article for Pacific Affairs seeks to determine causality and assess future intention.

Yongusil 57: BC Koh and North Korean Autonomies: Pacific Affairs Perspectives

By | February 13, 2015

This past December, the journal Pacific Affairs asked B.R. Myers, et al., to undertake a review of BC Koh’s classic 1965 paper “North Korea and its Quest for Autonomy.” The Yongusil considers the encounter.