Author Archive

Spaces of Leisure: The Socialist Modern at Rest and Play

By | November 09, 2014

In this final essay of a new triliogy, Robert Winstanley-Chesters traces connections between early repertoires of promenading on the banks of the Taedong and contemporary watery manifestations at Munsu and Rungna.

Yongusil 48: Korean Studies Graduate Conference 2014 at St. Petersburg State University

By | October 11, 2014

Korean scholarship on the banks of the Neva river has been ongoing for the best part of 150 years, and the Korean Studies Graduate Students Convention in Europe 2015 sought to continue the tradition. This Yongusil explores the exceptional contributions from Jerome de Wit, Andrew Jackson and others.

Spaces of Leisure: From Cinematic Birth to Physical Culture

By | September 27, 2014

Considering the development of leisure and entertainment in North Korea Robert Winstanley-Chesters tracks its movement from initial strategies focusing on the purely ideologic, political or cultural, to a return in the 1970s to a focus on sporting activity and spatiality.

Spaces of Leisure: A North Korean (Pre-) History

By | September 13, 2014

In the first of three essays, Robert Winstanley-Chesters analyzes the disconnect between North Korea’s revolutionary culture and the existence of consumption space, uncovering a pre-history of leisure and entertainment in North Korea.

Politics and Pollack: It Takes a Nation of Fishes

By | July 24, 2014

Bringing his Politics and Pollack series to a close, Robert Winstanley-Chesters explores the most recent pelagic developments in North Korea, focusing on the January 8 Fishing Station and the problematic notion of “charismatic time.”

Politics and Pollack: Fishing in the Age of the Six Goals

By | June 17, 2014

Continuing his series of essays focusing on maritime development in North Korea, Robert Winstanley-Chesters encounters the pelagic realm of the 1970s, revealing deficiencies in Kim Il-sung’s persistent attempts to increase the nation’s harvest of fish.