Art and Performance

Rock Gospels: Analyzing the Artistic Style of Moranbong Band

By | March 04, 2014

Has Kim Jong-un disbanded the Moranbong Band for good? Pekka Korhonen, a visiting scholar at Kyoto University, suggests this is the wrong question to ask, and delves into a trove of revealing data.

Sino-NK 2013 Rewind: Pop Politics and the Narrative of the Bizarre

By | December 20, 2013

Sherri L. Ter-Molen takes the “outside” tack on North Korean cultural production and media engagement in 2013. From Dennis Rodman to Jang Sung-taek via Angry Birds and the Samjiyon.

Sino-NK 2013 Rewind: North Korean Literature at Masik Speed

By | December 20, 2013

Benoit Berthelier examines North Korean cultural production from the “inside,” revealing literary outputs determinedly in step with current manifestations of the urgent–and of Kim Jong-un himself.

Yongusil 21: North Korean Review on the Unhasu Orchestra in Paris and the AP in Pyongyang

By | December 13, 2013

The Unhasu Orchestra has disappeared from North Korean cultural life. Adam Cathcart and Steven Denney explore that orchestra’s role (and that of the AP) in diplomacy within North Korea’s political repertoire, in a newly-published scholarly article for the North Korean Review.

Diplomatic Churning between Berlin and Pyongyang

By | October 18, 2013

The German government returns an Ambassador to Pyongyang with interests in cross-border trade in Sinuiju, North Korean succession issues, and “the liberal ’80s” in Beijing.

Leader as Teacher, Leader as Scribe: An Introduction to North Korean Children’s Literature

By | October 07, 2013

Christopher Richardson follows up on Sino-NK’s critically acclaimed “Benoit Symposium” with an exclusive essay on the challenge of children’s literary cultural production, focusing primarily on the classic text, “A Winged Horse.”

Benoit Symposium: Capitalist Dreams in the Communist Utopia: North Korea’s The Schoolgirl’s Diary

By | September 30, 2013

Engaging with a contemporary North Korean film, Sherri Ter Molen unpacks the usage of symbols derived from foreign–and what are often seen as hostile–sources within a distinctly North Korean cultural product.