The Jangmadang is Sino-NK’s marketplace for fresh ideas. In keeping with the tradition established by its eponymous counterpart in North Korea, our Jangmadang, written and managed by Sino-NK staff, provides short, snappy, but vital information on the latest documentary research and news. Unlike most English-language outlets, you will find that a majority of the sources are in Chinese or Korean, with cameo appearances from places like France, Germany and Japan. Jangmadang articles are a quick read, too. No introductions, just reliable translations and accurate, timely analysis.

Press Freedom and Split Ballots: #Shigak no. 22

By | May 26, 2015

#Shigak returns with fresh analysis of South Korea’s declining export competitiveness, a mixed assessment of media freedom, a by-election drubbing or three for the NPAD, and the judicial outcome of an unseemly defamation lawsuit.

Putting Statistics to the May 30th Measure

By | May 20, 2015

Interpreting economic data in and about North Korea is tricky; individual data points can balloon out of control. Christopher Green looks at the debate over North Korean economic growth and what really happened on May 30.

Satellites and State Media: Breaking Down Recent Execution Rumors

By | May 04, 2015

Is it in any sense possible to corroborate recent assertions that North Korea may have executed officials with massive 50-caliber machine guns?

Grist to the Mill of South Korea’s Changing Values

By | May 04, 2015

Like everything else in South Korea, attitudes and values are undergoing change. Steven Denney contextualizes and translates.

Factional Politics and Contentious Memorials: #Shigak no. 21

By | April 24, 2015

The sex trade is a battleground wherever you go, and South Korea is no different. In this edition of #Shigak, the Constitutional Court in Seoul gears up to pass judgment on an unpopular 2004 law. Elsewhere, the state remembers the Cheonan for the final time.

South Korea’s Evolving Immigration Policy and National Identity Reflection

By | April 15, 2015

Rapid demographic changes in South Korea have changed the cultural and ethnic makeup of the nation. While official government discourse is optimistic, a closer look at peoples’ actual opinions paints a different picture. Darcie Draudt translates.