Chinese Capitalism

Yongusil 77: Reconfiguring Histories in the Borderland: A Workshop in Leeds

By | September 29, 2015

With Hyun Ok Park’s new book as a point of departure, Adam Cathcart and Christopher Green will assess the depth of interconnectivity between and among states, cities, ethnicities, and capital in the border region.

Currency, Trade, and Criminal Conspiracies in Dandong

By | September 23, 2015

As North Korea prepares for a missile test, China gears up for a big trade fair with the DPRK. This post weaves assessments for bilateral trade together with the iron fist of law enforcement in Dandong.

How Not to Invest in a DPRK Special Economic Zone: The Case of Rason

By | July 15, 2015

Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are spaces of great potential in North Korea. Théo Clément evaluates the terrain, based on his own on-site inspection and a holistic reading of North Korea’s premier northern SEZ.

How Long Will the Umbrellas Hold Out? Report from Hong Kong

By | October 11, 2014

Sino-NK’s Junior Fellow for 2013-2014, Byul Ryan-Im, reports from the barricades of Occupy Central.

End of an Era of Huge Profits: Mainland Businessmen Talk Sino-DPRK Border Trade

By | January 23, 2014

As interlocutors from both sides of the Sino-North Korea borderland trade attempt to find new footing, Chinese views of the business environment in the DPRK are more important than ever. Matthew Bates and Adam Cathcart translate, with photos from Mr. Bates.

Growth Prospects and the Potential for Progress in the DPRK’s Agricultural Sector: Infrastructure and Incentives

By | June 23, 2013

Matthew Bates completes his discussion with agronomist Tom Morrison on the prospects of food self-sufficiency in North Korea. In the final installment of a three part series, Morrison finishes his discussion of agricultural reforms and delves into a dialogue about the geography of rice and potato production.

The Golden Age Is Over: Stacking Up Borderlands Sources in Dandong

By | April 30, 2013

Are dozens of Chinese capitalists really camping out in Pyongyang, trying to get their money back? Adam Cathcart translates and goes back to the future to find out.