Cultural Relations

North Korean Scholars and Koguryo: How to Reignite a Historical Controversy on Chinese National Day

By | October 03, 2014

With a host of signs popping up that ties between Beijing and Pyongyang are poor, and a few that suggest the opposite, Adam Cathcart looks at how the North Korean government is currently brandishing an unmistakable totem of clashing nationalisms.

German Shepherds and German Musical Politics in North Korea

By | October 01, 2014

Among the elite music academies of Pyongyang, performances take place of German symphonic literature and avant-garde contemporary music; our editor-in-chief assesses the scene.

Spaces of Leisure: From Cinematic Birth to Physical Culture

By | September 27, 2014

Considering the development of leisure and entertainment in North Korea Robert Winstanley-Chesters tracks its movement from initial strategies focusing on the purely ideologic, political or cultural, to a return in the 1970s to a focus on sporting activity and spatiality.

Yongusil 45: PRC Power Consolidation, the Korean War, and the “Cold Front” of Historical Research in Hong Kong

By | September 18, 2014

In a conference which took place on September 15-16 at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, an array of new scholarship was presented which indicated the scope and depth of the Chinese Communist Party’s power consolidation during the Korean War. Sino-NK’s own Adam Cathcart presented his work alongside several up-and-coming students and established scholars.

Yongusil 35: Qualitative Inquiry from Pyongyang to the Illinois Prairie

By | May 17, 2014

The 10th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, starting May 21, will cover a number of analytic bases, from conceptions of Utopia in American children’s literature to Chinese governmentality and Koreatown’s place in transnational urbanization. Sino-NK recaps the forthcoming event.

A Bifurcated Review of De-bordering Korea: Tangible and Intangible Legacies of the Sunshine Policy

By | May 12, 2014

Seven full years have passed since the second and final “sunshine policy” president, the late Roh Moo-hyun, left office. Yet debate over the historic value of the decade of sunshine persists. In Sino-NK’s latest review, two members of the team look at a brand new Routledge edited volume that attempts to assess the social legacy of the era.