Korean War

Kim Jong-un, Jeremy Corbyn, and the Trident Debate

By | July 26, 2016

At a recent Parliamentary debate in London, North Korea was raised time and again as justification for the renewal of Britain’s submarine nuclear deterrent. Adam Cathcart parses what it means for the besieged opposition Labour Party, and peers into shadows of Korean War destruction for the Conservatives.

Reinterpreting the Withdrawal of Chinese Troops from North Korea, 1956-1958

By | July 12, 2016

Did Kim Il-sung’s nationalism force the Chinese out of North Korea in the 1950s, or was it an agreed strategy meant to bolster anti-US propaganda? This post reviews new data on a pivotal moment in Chinese-North Korean relations.

Chests Full of Brass: A DPRK Political History in Orders, Medals, Prizes, and Titles

By | January 08, 2016

The DPRK state structure can be hard to discern from the outside, but it is possible to structure analysis so as to dissipate the fog somewhat. Here, Martin Weiser wields the state system of awards and medals to shed light on national history.

Red Scares and History Wars: #Shigak no. 25

By | October 28, 2015

The latest issue of #Shigak reports on new developments and top stories in South Korea for September and October. In this issue, Park Geun-hye goes to Washington, the number of multicultural families continues to increase, and Moon Jae-in gets labeled a… communist?

Yongusil 66: Suzy Kim, Cross-Currents and the (De)Memorialization of the Memorial

By | April 22, 2015

Suzy Kim, author of Everyday Life in the North Korean Revolution, has guest edited a special edition of Cross-Currents, an open access journal at University of California, Berkeley, engaging in a deep examination of ill-remembered and heavily contested moments of modern Korean history.

Yongusil 52: Afterlives and Critical Histories at the University of Toronto

By | November 03, 2014

“The Afterlives of the Korean War,” a symposium hosted by the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto, hosted a number of scholars whose work falls outside the normal remit of scholarship on the Korean War and its consequences. Steven Denney writes about the significance of alternative perspectives.