Rodong Sinmun

Politics and Pollack: It Takes a Nation of Fishes

By | July 24, 2014

Bringing his Politics and Pollack series to a close, Robert Winstanley-Chesters explores the most recent pelagic developments in North Korea, focusing on the January 8 Fishing Station and the problematic notion of “charismatic time.”

Tongsin no. 4: War Games and Sewol Sinking

By | June 19, 2014

The latest Tongsin for March–May 2014 examines the DPRK response to US-ROK war games and the Sewol disaster, in which the North attempts to illustrate a united Sino-DPRK perspective that is both anti-American and anti-South Korean.

Tongsin no. 03

By | March 14, 2014

The latest Tongsin | 통신 for February 2014 examines the North Korean narrative surrounding the US-ROK war games, which positions the North as a cooperative actor seeking engagement and stability in the face of destructive “confrontation rackets” in the South.

Tongsin no. 02

By | February 10, 2014

Tongsin | 통신 offers source data on Rodong Sinmun and the KCNA’s narratives regarding China. The latest Tongsin | 통신 examines the position of China in the DPRK-ROK dispute over impending military exercises and possible reunification.

Lexicon of Conspiracy: Jang Sung-taek’s Chinese Execution Document

By | January 02, 2014

What did Jang Sung-taek really do to merit his summary execution in North Korea? A Chinese version of his death sentence contains multiple clues, including involvement with defections of North Korean youth, according to Adam Cathcart.

Jang Sung-taek: Chopped Off at the Knees

By | December 05, 2013

The purge of Jang Sung-taek has provided the world with a fresh layer of Korean peninsula intrigue, and yet more questions about the nature of Kimist dominance in the era of Jong-un. As the Twittersphere flutters, Nick Miller weighs in. Additional content from Christopher Green.

South Korea Dying in the Heat: Reading the North Korean Media Machine

By | August 15, 2013

Christopher Green pauses to consider the value of weather to the North Korean state media discourse, and finds that uncontrollable inclemency is a key trope in sustaining the ruling domain consensus.

“Patriotism Begins from Love of Courtyard:” Sepho and the Scaling of the Environmental

By | August 06, 2013

No one covers North Korea’s expressions of the “Byungjin line” with more panache than Robert Winstanley-Chesters, who examines the role of families and local neighborhood units in cultivating North Korean legitimacy.