Politics

Do Not Swear by the Moon: #Shigak no. 41

By | May 17, 2017

The election may be over, but #Shigak is not. In the first installment following Moon Jae-in’s election, we review new political developments, including the new administration’s reaction to North Korea’s latest missile test, profiles of those constituting the new administration, and the return of “March of the Beloved” to official status.

Anti-Communism Endures: Political Implications of ROK Political Culture

By | May 08, 2017

Anti-communism has a long and storied history in South Korea. Nobody disputes the prevalence of anti-communist sentiment. The public of all ages retains the view that there is an ongoing need for anti-communist ideology. Steven Denney looks at the data.

The Home Stretch: #Shigak no. 39

By | May 06, 2017

The South Korean presidential election may be mere days away, but it continues to throw up some fascinating stories. We look at some of the best in this, the penultimate pre-election edition of #Shigak.

Vying for Second Place: #Shigak no. 38

By | May 03, 2017

With the election less than a week away, is it the beginning of the end for the Bareun Party and its charismatic leader, Yoo Seung-min? This question is on the slate in this edition of #Shigak.

THAAD and the Great Power Context III: The Quiet Exception in Russian Geopolitics

By | April 18, 2017

Continuing his analysis of Russia’s position on THAAD from a regional security perspective, Anthony Rinna seeks to extrapolate some of the economic and geopolitical issues lying behind the THAAD factor in Russia-South Korea bilateral relations.

Unified Candidacy? No, Thanks: #Shigak no. 27

By | April 04, 2017

This issue of #Shigak arrives at the culmination of the party primaries. The candidates have now all been confirmed, but the question of who will be president is far from settled. Moon Jae-in is still the favorite, but Ahn Cheol-soo isn’t far behind.

Four Salient Martial Orientations: A Review of Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea

By | December 16, 2016

The first volume of a new series on Park Chung-hee marks a step forward for our understanding of Park’s roots. The advance may be even greater where the structure of early 20th century Japanese rule in Northeast Asia is concerned. Writing exclusively for Sino-NK, Clark Sorenson (University of Washington) reviews the new text.

A Roundtable Review of Carter Eckert’s Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea: The Roots of Militarism, 1866-1945

By | December 16, 2016

Sino-NK presents a roundtable review of Carter Eckert’s splendid new book on the Manchurian roots of Korean militarism, offering readers a companion to the main review by Prof. Clark Sorenson.