Posts Tagged ‘Kim Jong-un’

Moscow vs. Vladivostok: Prospects for a Russia-North Korea Summit

By | February 23, 2015

Did Kim Jong-un already meet Xi Jinping in northeast China? And will the North Korean leader show up in Moscow this coming May? A guest voice assesses the potential.

Collapsist Narratives and State Strength: Reading The Interview through Han Sorya’s Jackals

By | February 18, 2015

Han Sorya’s conception of Americans as “jackals” is a wartime description of an enemy but one that never went away–in a sense like the war itself. In this essay, David Fields surveys the strength of North Korean state narratives, folding in a very famous Korean War short story and a certain controversial Hollywood film.

Hagiography of the Kims & the Childhood of Saints: Kim Il-sung

By | January 31, 2015

In this essay Christopher Richardson explores the childhood hagiography of Kim Il-sung, “the master narrative from which all others derive,” and in so doing locates the origins of regime durability and state legitimacy.

Mountains and Seas of Gold: 2015 New Year’s Message

By | January 27, 2015

Robert Winstanley-Chesters returns to Sino-NK with his thoughts on Kim Jong-un’s 2015 New Year’s Address from a developmental and narrative point of view, going past – way, way past – debatable calls for inter-Korean rapprochement to look at the developmental sloughs and sumps therein concealed.

Yongusil 56: Building Domain Consensus Through Narrative

By | January 12, 2015

The first Yongusil of 2015 encounters a reconceptualization of the bounds, nature, and possibility of “domain consensus” and its deployment in recent analysis of North Korea in the Review of Korean Studies.

Yongusil 51: WCNKS, Seoul–Thinking, Remembering, Forgetting… Dreaming

By | October 31, 2014

Known Knowns, Known Unknowns and Unknown Unknowns, Rumsfeldian cliché or truism for North Korean analysis. Following the thickets of the 1st World Congress on North Korean Studies perhaps it is time to just start knowing.