Posts Tagged ‘Kim Jong-un’

Hagiography of the Kims & the Childhood of Saints: Kim Il-sung

By | January 31, 2015

In this essay Christopher Richardson explores the childhood hagiography of Kim Il-sung, “the master narrative from which all others derive,” and in so doing locates the origins of regime durability and state legitimacy.

Mountains and Seas of Gold: 2015 New Year’s Message

By | January 27, 2015

Robert Winstanley-Chesters returns to Sino-NK with his thoughts on Kim Jong-un’s 2015 New Year’s Address from a developmental and narrative point of view, going past – way, way past – debatable calls for inter-Korean rapprochement to look at the developmental sloughs and sumps therein concealed.

Yongusil 56: Building Domain Consensus Through Narrative

By | January 12, 2015

The first Yongusil of 2015 encounters a reconceptualization of the bounds, nature, and possibility of “domain consensus” and its deployment in recent analysis of North Korea in the Review of Korean Studies.

Yongusil 51: WCNKS, Seoul–Thinking, Remembering, Forgetting… Dreaming

By | October 31, 2014

Known Knowns, Known Unknowns and Unknown Unknowns, Rumsfeldian cliché or truism for North Korean analysis. Following the thickets of the 1st World Congress on North Korean Studies perhaps it is time to just start knowing.

Communist Normalcy: How Authoritarian Leaders Disappear and Return

By | October 21, 2014

Kim Jong-un has now made a handful of public appearances since ending his 40+ days out of the public eye, and it appears clear that the young leader’s health was a major cause of his absence. This came as no surprise to analyst Nick Miller.

Hagiography of the Kims and the Childhood of Saints: Kim Jong-il

By | August 12, 2014

Christopher Richardson examines the mythological narrative of Kim Jong-il’s genesis, uncovering the carefully constructed combination of religion, half-truths, and state propaganda.