Posts Tagged ‘Kim Jong-un’

Satellites and State Media: Breaking Down Recent Execution Rumors

By | May 04, 2015

Is it in any sense possible to corroborate recent assertions that North Korea may have executed officials with massive 50-caliber machine guns?

Yongusil 65: Adam Cathcart on the Footprints of Legitimacy

By | April 07, 2015

Pyongyang’s narrative response to the ascension of Kim Jong-un has drawn deep and heavy upon the past, indicating a certain conservatism and “ideological retrenchment,” argues Adam Cathcart in a SOAS-AKS Working Paper in Korean Studies. Director of Research, Robert Winstanley-Chesters, reviews the paper.

Does a New Ambassador Mean a “Reset” In China-North Korea Relations?

By | March 27, 2015

With a deep dive into Beijing’s internal bureaucratic politics and Li Jinjun’s predecessors in Pyongyang, Nathan Beauchamp-Mustafaga sheds light on China’s evolving stance toward North Korea.

Moscow vs. Vladivostok: Prospects for a Russia-North Korea Summit

By | February 23, 2015

Did Kim Jong-un already meet Xi Jinping in northeast China? And will the North Korean leader show up in Moscow this coming May? A guest voice assesses the potential.

Collapsist Narratives and State Strength: Reading The Interview through Han Sorya’s Jackals

By | February 18, 2015

Han Sorya’s conception of Americans as “jackals” is a wartime description of an enemy but one that never went away–in a sense like the war itself. In this essay, David Fields surveys the strength of North Korean state narratives, folding in a very famous Korean War short story and a certain controversial Hollywood film.

Hagiography of the Kims & the Childhood of Saints: Kim Il-sung

By | January 31, 2015

In this essay Christopher Richardson explores the childhood hagiography of Kim Il-sung, “the master narrative from which all others derive,” and in so doing locates the origins of regime durability and state legitimacy.