Returning to the Courtyard: Rescaling Charismatic Landscapes in North Korea

By | July 27, 2015

Robert Winstanley-Chesters considers how human and critical geographies can be used as vectors for analysis of the viability of North Korea’s political landscapes.

The Economics of Identity Change in South Korea

By | June 19, 2015

A demographic revolution has brought about manifold economic and political changes in South Korea over the last few decades, and might even be changing the way South Koreans think about the “nation.” Steven Denney reviews some of the relevant literature and talks with an agent of social change.

Cultures of Critique: Kim Jong-un on North Korean Deforestation

By | June 08, 2015

Kim Jong-un’s recent rhetoric lamented the deforestation of the North Korean landscape; Sino-NK assesses the challenges and possibilities for innovation.

Yongusil 68: Divided Visions, United Vistas: Afforestation and the Visual Production of Politics in the Yushin Era

By | May 08, 2015

Sino-NK’s Director of Research, Dr. Robert Winstanley-Chesters, and Sino-NK’s Social Media Coordinator, Sherri Ter Molen, have been channeling the work of Heonik Kwon and Clifford Geertz on theatric and performative practices in their comparative work on North and South Korea. This Yongusil documents their work this year.

Yongusil 53: A World of Koreanists in Hawaii

By | November 11, 2014

The 7th World Congress of Korean Studies was held at the University of Hawaii, Manoa’s East West Center. Sino-NK was there, presenting and listening to the latest in empirical output from the world of Korean Studies.

Spaces of Leisure: A North Korean (Pre-) History

By | September 13, 2014

In the first of three essays, Robert Winstanley-Chesters analyzes the disconnect between North Korea’s revolutionary culture and the existence of consumption space, uncovering a pre-history of leisure and entertainment in North Korea.

Yongusil 43: Baekdu and the Re-materialization of Korean Mountains at the Royal Geographical Society

By | August 30, 2014

Due in large part to the florid narratives of North Korean state power, Mt. Baekdu is often an object or passive presence in discussion; however, it is rarely subjected to assessment in its own right. One panel at the ongoing Royal Geographical Society annual international conference attempted to change that.

Politics and Pollack: It Takes a Nation of Fishes

By | July 24, 2014

Bringing his Politics and Pollack series to a close, Robert Winstanley-Chesters explores the most recent pelagic developments in North Korea, focusing on the January 8 Fishing Station and the problematic notion of “charismatic time.”