Author Archive

Nationalism in an Era of Strength and Prosperity: Politics and People in Post-Developmental South Korea

By | January 16, 2014

In the fall of last year, South Korea sent tanks, soldiers, and missiles down the streets of central Seoul in the largest military parade seen there in almost a decade. Steven Denney and Karl Friedhoff, writing for CSIS’s PacNet Newsletter, looked for broader societal changes beyond the pomp of the parade.

History and Revolution: An Interview with Dr. Suzy Kim

By | December 16, 2013

Steven Denney speaks with Dr. Suzy Kim (Rutgers University) about the DPRK’s tangled origins, the impact of Bruce Cumings, and her new book: Everyday Life in the North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950.

Sino-NK 2013 Rewind: Saegyehwa Politics and South Korea in the Age of Globalization

By | December 13, 2013

Steven Denney investigates politics and the political in the ROK during 2013, a new Park era, but the continuation of Saegyehwa/Globalization politics.

Hani Says “Don’t Be Fooled” by False Political Divides

By | November 17, 2013

The distorted divide in South Korea between left and right, conservative and progressive, shields a far more pronounced divide between the forces of democracy and… something else. A recent Hankyoreh column, deconstructed by Steven Denney.

Chosun Ilbo “Debates” the Production of History

By | November 10, 2013

The imbroglio over school history education continues apace in South Korea, with Prime Minister Jung weighing into the debate on November 5. Steven Denney keeps us abreast of things.

Forget about the “Trustpolitik,” Let’s Talk Won

By | November 07, 2013

Trust can come in many forms, but in Korea there is a serious lack of it. According to Professor Jin Jingyi of Peking University, the key is to transit away from futile attempts to foster political trust, and onto an “economics-first,” or “trusteconomik” if you prefer, approach. Steven Denney explains.

The Strength to Concede in Developmental Asia

By | November 02, 2013

Do autocrats cede power to democracy when in fear of the alternative, or is there an alternative hypothesis: that strength increases the likelihood of democratization? East Asian case studies give food for thought. Let Steven Denney be your guide.