Diplomacy

Yongusil 101: South Korea between Russia-US Great Power Tensions

By | October 30, 2020

The US policy community has, since 2018, applied the term “Indo-Pacific” to the lands and waters from Hawaii to west of the Indian subcontinent. Underscoring the geopolitical connection between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean, the so-labeled Indo-Pacific has become the focal point of growing tensions between the United States and the People’s Republic […]

Brazil and Mexico’s Relations with North Korea

By | September 24, 2020

As the United Nations General Assembly convenes in New York, Tony Rinna revisits Latin American approaches to North Korean security issues. While neither state is presently serving on the UN Security Council, both Brazil and Mexico had served on the UNSC during some of North Korea’s security provocations in the late Kim Jong Il era […]

Six Hours to Midnight: GSOMIA and the US Indo-Pacific Strategy

By | November 25, 2019

South Korea’s narrowly-avoided decision to terminate GSOMIA underscores how the ROK’s defense priorities in Northeast Asia affect the US’s Indo-Pacific strategy as a whole.

Small but Indispensable: South Korea as “Jungjaeja”

By | March 01, 2019

Does South Korea have much room to manoeuvre in the aftermath of the failed Hanoi talks? Yujin Lim looks at the small power as mediator.

Russia and Korean Security: The Views from Seoul and Tokyo

By | February 18, 2019

Anthony Rinna looks at how Seoul and Tokyo have been dealing with Russia in a world of neo-Cold War tensions between Moscow and Washington.

The Korean Peninsula and Great Power Geopolitics: Then and Now

By | November 05, 2018

Anthony Rinna returns with a look at how the history of international relations in late 19th and early 20th Northeast Asia can help inform us of the possible future trajectory of Beijing-Moscow ties.

China and Russia on a Nuclear North Korea: Policy Alignment, Divergent Relationships

By | September 12, 2018

What is the state of Sino-DPRK and Russia-DPRK relations? A quick glance might led one to think there is total Chinese and Russian policy convergence vis-a-vis Korea, but the evidence indicates significant differences in how Moscow and Beijing see the DPRK. Anthony Rinna explains.

Dual Perspective: Reading Thae Yong-ho

By | August 15, 2018

Thae Yong-ho’s memoir marks a bold attempt to push back the tide of South Korean public ambivalence toward North Korea, a sprawling 500-page narrative of his experiences in the DPRK diplomatic corps over twenty years and ending with his 2016 defection. Robert Lauler takes a look at this essential, if flawed, text.