Korean Media

The Road to Pyongyang II: Inter-Korean Summits and North Korean Media

By | April 21, 2018

In the second part of a series on Pyongyang’s domestic media coverage, Kyle Pope examines the portrayal of the chief actors involved in the high politics of summits: the leaders of the two Koreas.

The Road to Pyongyang: Inter-Korean Summits and North Korean Media

By | March 31, 2018

How were previous inter-Korean summits covered by North Korean media? In part one of a two-part series, Kyle Pope digs into material at the Ministry of Unification’s North Korea Documents Center for answers.

Translation in Isolation: The Rare, the Bad, and the Weird

By | July 06, 2017

In his third installation of a multipart series, Martin Weiser returns to the question of translation. By tracing the process by which translations come into being, he highlights the limitations and bottlenecks that are created by the need to translate into multiple languages on a daily basis.

Anti-Communism Endures: Political Implications of ROK Political Culture

By | May 08, 2017

Anti-communism has a long and storied history in South Korea. Nobody disputes the prevalence of anti-communist sentiment. The public of all ages retains the view that there is an ongoing need for anti-communist ideology. Steven Denney looks at the data.

Prominent Defections in 2016: How North and South Korea Responded

By | March 29, 2017

Tom Fowdy looks back at 2016, when two defections made headlines around the world. He finds that, seemingly as usual, the pre-eminent concern on both sides of the DMZ appeared to be scoring geopolitical points.

South Korea Clings on to Fear of Kaesong Industrial Complex Future

By | March 02, 2017

A year after it closed, South Korea is still eyeing the Kaesong Industrial Complex. The issues are not only financial, but also emotional. Christopher Green translates a recent report about North Korea allegedly trying to attract Chinese businesses into the manufacturing zone.

Unstable Rhetoric: Few Additions, Some Changes, Lots of Omissions

By | February 23, 2017

In the second piece in his series on reading the North Korean media, Martin Weiser looks at the unstable nature of North Korean published rhetoric, which has a tendency to change across formats, and the ways in which this impacts upon reading and interpretation.

On Reading North Korean Media: The Curse of the Web

By | October 31, 2016

In the first of a series based on evidence from more than two years spent mapping North Korean online media, Martin Weiser highlights patterns in how North Korean organizations operate and how human error and unchecked individual inputs can shape what we come to read.